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A University that’s Reshaping the City’s Economy

The University of Hull is an excellent place to study, which is reflected in its winning of an Outstanding Administrative Services trophy at the Times Higher Education Awards, plus a £200m redevelopment project that’s transforming its many listed and iconic buildings. What’s more, the campus also contains Hull University Business School (HUBS), the home …

Why Peak Stuff is good news for Crowdfunding as an investment model

Peak Oil is something most of us have heard of – it is essentially the realisation that oil is running out but is more specifically defined as the point at which the extraction of oil has reached its maximum and goes into terminal decline as an available, naturally occurring resource. But now we are increasingly seeing media reports of Peak Stuff – its everywhere, every analyst and every economist has latched on to the fact that, for apparently no good reason, we have simply stopped buying as much ‘stuff’.

How Crowdfunding can turn powerlessness into power

Fear is an incredibly powerful emotional state. It can paralyse us or it can fill us with a high-intensity urge to fight our way out of trouble. The paralysis option usually manifests itself directly from a sense of powerlessness – and we don’t have to look far to see endless examples of this in our everyday lives.
We individually feel powerless in the face of financial pressures; rising prices; and economic uncertainty. We feel ‘frozen out’ of the big conversations and their resultant decisions. Essentially we don’t get to have a say in how things play out.

Necessity is the mother of invention…and Crowdfunding

Sometimes ignorance really is bliss. This blog is not advocating ignorance as a way forward or indeed trumpeting it as a life tool of any sort – we’re merely saying that, occasionally, sticking one’s head in the stand is temporarily preferable to engaging with reality. Every so often it is perfectly and normally human to feel the urge to take our lead from ostriches.

Why Crowdfunding could actually save your life

“Is there a Doctor in the house?” is a shout that only goes up when illness or injury has come suddenly and publicly upon some unfortunate individual – usually in a public space or amenity and very occasionally in appalling incidences of catastrophe or terror. That call can only be answered by a very, very select few. The few who chose to dedicate a minimum of seven years to the study of the human body’s function and vulnerabilities and also to the alleviation of the pain and distress that those vulnerabilities facilitate.

Q: So, Mr President , how did you win the election? A: “Crowdfunding”

3,000 years ago, a heavily armed 6ft 9in giant strode out from the ranks of the Philistine army each morning for 40 days and bellowed the same message to their Israelite opposition across the valley: “Choose a man and have him come down to me. If he is able to fight and kill me, we will become your subjects; but if I overcome him and kill him, you will become our subjects and serve us.”
Eventually on the 40th day, a young shepherd (who happened to be delivering food to his soldier brothers that morning) took him up on his challenge and stepped forward, armed only with five smooth stones and a sling.
The giant was Goliath and the boy was David. The rest is – quite literally – history.

Crowdfunding has always been with us – we just didn’t realise it

There’s nothing new under the sun. There’s no such thing as an original idea. It’s all been done before. Etc, etc. We’re all familiar with those throwaway platitudes, the classic cynics’ catchphrase analysis – usually of an initiative in which they’ve had no involvement.

But those phrases are rooted in a statement made by a man who began his working life as a steamboat captain on the Mississippi. What he actually said was: “There is no such thing as a new idea. It is impossible. We simply take a lot of old ideas and put them into a sort of mental kaleidoscope. We give them a turn and they make new and curious combinations”

Why pinball wizards and railway porters’ sons can lead us to a secure financial future

If a couple of old pensioners called Mervyn and Warren insisted that you sit next to them for a minute while they give you the benefit of their advice, you’d be forgiven for respectfully accepting their offer but privately hoping it won’t last longer than the time it takes you to sink the lukewarm cuppa you’ve just been handed by their stony-faced young careworker.

But when those senior citizens are giants of finance (one a swashbuckling 83-year-old multi-billionaire, the other a retired custodian of global levers of finance) – and the advice is their pronouncements on our economic wellbeing, then it is worth taking heed.

How disco helps David Cameron save the European Union

When the aging opera singer Viola Williams taught her grand-daughters to sing in the late 1960s, little did she realize that Debbie, Joni, Kathy and Kim Sledge would go on to define the concept of strength in numbers… through disco.

Just a few years later, as Sister Sledge they stormed the charts worldwide with the floor-filling global smash hit ‘We are Family’ – and the song has been habitually trotted out as a soundtrack for togetherness ever since.

Football can be enthralling, breathtaking, nailbiting – yes. But beautiful? Not often. As a barometer of economic wellbeing it is also proven to be an unreliable instrument, with fans continuing to shell out for season tickets and merchandise despite soaring prices and falling wages. Hardly a yardstick for realistic economic forecasting.

How fishwives and football fans demonstrate the wisdom and power of crowds

Those who describe football as ‘the beautiful game’ have usually never been anywhere near a terrace. Much the same as those who describe the open seas as ‘majestic’, have never stood on the open-deck of a trawler at midnight in the face of a 50ft wave.

Football can be enthralling, breathtaking, nailbiting – yes. But beautiful? Not often. As a barometer of economic wellbeing it is also proven to be an unreliable instrument, with fans continuing to shell out for season tickets and merchandise despite soaring prices and falling wages. Hardly a yardstick for realistic economic forecasting.